Sunday, November 25, 2012

to Mince or to Mince

I cut and Barbs minced - I remember all too well the days of the hand mincer. Not everything from the days of yesteryear was better. We did cats fish (wrasse, Aus salmon, and leatherjacket) for the next 2 months, and then last night I went out shooting wallaby with Norman and 'big wed'(ATV) and the new spotlight he has fitted to it, and shot 6 wallaby. I have cut and minced 2 so far, and another one and we'll have stocks of dog food past Past James's Harare re-affirmation of vows. My shooting must be getting better as I only shot at and missed completely 1 wallaby. My gutting and skinning is definitely getting better. I wasn't still at it at 2 AM.

The strawberries have given us our first two Strawbs and cream

I collected some turkey poo yesterday - it's a hard solid 10 litre bucket full - rock hard. Any bright ideas how I should use this supposedly wondeful nitrogen source appreciated. My carrot show some signs of very variable nutrients...


It's a lovely looking day so hopefully will get a chance to try dive flag mk1 later. But now, to work.



10 comments:

  1. Is turkeypoo as dangerously overstrong as the chicken variety?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Seems like stuff to sprinkle on several layers of the compost pile.

      Delete
    2. unfortunately it's very solid large lumps (turkeys-at least these, drop their offerings rather wet, from a height. so it's a hard little mountain, i broke with a spade

      Delete
  2. Since turkey will also eat meat their poo is not safe for veggies unless they are domesticated and have only eaten pellets.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Faint but pursuing here - why? (it is remotely possible that they'll eat meat - if they beat the crows and other birds of prey to it, which isn't a very high probability.) If it is as a disease vector - they poo on the grass, which the cows, sheep, wallaby, pheasants, geese and other turkeys eat, all of which I handle the raw meat and entrails of. They don't go onto the roads so roadkill is rare for them and we deadhole the dead stock or other animals to keep down the blowies, and their crops are mostly full of clover.

      Delete
  3. I've found mice and frogs in Turkey tummies. Obviously wild game is going to eat fodder that's contaminated with droppings from other animals, including carnivores, that then passes through their gut. Which deals with it. Our guts don't deal well with the type of Fecal Coliform bacteria that comes from a meat eaters gut. It is thought that the increase in the amount of animal byproducts put into chicken, turkey and cow pellets is one reason hookworms, round worms, Salmonella, Glardia and E. Coli are actually rising from a low in the early 90's. Therefore any compost made with waste from an animal that has eaten red meat is highly discouraged over here. The composting process simply doesn't generate enough heat to kill the bugs and parasite eggs.

    OTOH, you're in a completely different eco system over there with less of the type of meat that's a turkey is likely to eat over here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wrote a lengthy reply and blogger ate it. I think it's much lower risk here (only predators are feral cats) and pelleted feed is too expensive for anything but horses and chickens, and these turkeys are domestic ones gone feral - not very bright or athletic. But what do you think of boiling the stuff? I have lots of wood, 44 gallon drums.

      Delete
  4. Maybe just toss it in a drum half full of water and let it soak a few days; it might not need boiling. Compost tea.

    ReplyDelete